Articles in Category: Job Vacancies

 

PhD position available in Chronobiology at the Chair of Nutrition and Immunology, Technical University Munich, Germany

PhD position available in Chronobiology at the Chair of Nutrition and Immunology, Technical University Munich, Germany

 

Who we are: We establish a new research direction at the TUM to study the molecular bases of circadian rhythms, and their connections to physiology, in particular gastrointestinal functions in rodents. Therefore, we connect recent topics on inflammation and cancer of the gastrointestinal system with biological rhythms „chronobiology“. 

Research Area 

Many physiological processes present near-24h „circadian “oscillations. These daily rhythms are called circadian rhythms, and they are generated by circadian clocks. The master circadian clock in mammals such as mice or humans is located in the brain, more specifically in a region of the hypothalamus called the suprachiasmatic nucleus. However, recent research has shown that clocks are also present in other brain regions and in most peripheral organs too. During evolution, circadian clocks have evolved by giving an advantage to living organisms, by adapting their physiology to the cyclically changing environment (e.g. light/dark, warm/cold daily cycles), and by organizing in time the processes occurring in various tissues and within cells. Thus, it is not a surprise that disturbances of circadian clocks have been associated with various diseases, including cancer, metabolic diseases and mood disorders. The chronobiology research at the Chair of Nutrition and Immunology aims at deciphering how these clocks impact on gastrointestinal diseases. 

The position is initially for 3 years. The salary is based on the German public service salary scale (TV-L). 

Requirements 

- you should have a MSc or equivalent in Biology, Medical Science or related disciplines, preferably with a strong background in immunology and/or physiology 

- you are expected to have an excellent academic record and be fluent in English (wrinting and speech) 

- experience in performing scientific mouse experiments (mouse handling), especially in immunology or physiology and behavior is highly appreciated 

Further Enquiries and Application 

For more information and requests for advice on the application procedure please by send an Email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The following documents should be send until the 31th of May 2017: CV, certificates, grades, research interest and a motivation letter. Information regarding the Chair of Nutrition and Immunology at the Technical University Munich will be found at http://bflm.wzw.tum.de/index.php?id=4&L=1 

References 

1) Kiessling S., Beaulieu-Laroche L., Blum I., Landgraf D., Welsh D.K., Storch K.F., Labrecque N. and Cermakian N., "Activating circadian clock function in cancer cells inhibits tumor growth ", BMC Biology, 2017, Feb 14; 15(1):13 

2) Kiessling, S., Eichele G., and Oster H., "Adrenal glucocorticoids have a key role in circadian resynchronization in a mouse model of jet lag." J Clin Invest, 2010. 120(7). 

3) Oster, H., Damerow, S., Kiessling, S., Jakubcakova, V., Abraham, D., Tian, J., Hoffmann, M. W. And Eichele, G.et al., "The circadian rhythm of glucocorticoids is regulated by a gating mechanism residing in the adrenal cortical clock." Cell Metab. 2006 4(2). 

 

Post-Doctoral Fellowship - Zeitzer laboratory at Stanford University/VA Palo Alto

The Zeitzer laboratory at Stanford University/VA Palo Alto is recruiting a post-doctoral fellow with a guarantee of at least two years of funding. The anticipated start date is September 1, 2016, with funding being provided by the Department of Defense. The overarching purpose of this project is to determine the parameters of sequences of light flashes to optimize their effects in shifting the timing of the human circadian clock. We have recently shown that these light flashes can be more effective than continuous light at evoking changes in circadian phase (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26854928). For a more complete list of publications see: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/browse/collection/47962065/. Fellows are expected to maintain a rigorous scientific project and will be responsible for the conduct, supervision, and analysis of all aspects of the protocol.

A PhD in with a focus on circadian rhythms, sleep, or visual neurobiology is required. For more information or for initial inquiries, please email Dr. Zeitzer atThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please send along a CV and contact information for at least three individuals who can provide references.

 

  • Jamie M. Zeitzer, Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor
  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
  • Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine
  • Stanford University
  • Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center
  • VA Palo Alto Health Care System
  • 3801 Miranda Avenue (151Y)
  • Palo Alto CA 94304

POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS:

The molecular and neuronal bases of socially regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms in bees, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Both honeybees and bumblebees show natural socially regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms. 'Clock genes' cycle in the brain of the rhythmic foragers but not in “nurse” bees which tend brood around the clock, suggesting that chronobiological plasticity is associated with reorganization of the circadian clockwork. Nevertheless, a subset of pacemakers apparently measure time in around-the-clock active bees because when removed from the hive they rapidly switch to activity with strong circadian rhythms and a phase correlated with ambient day-night cycles. Why do nurse bees that are active around the clock in a tightly regulated environment need a functional clock? How does the circadian system of bees organized to allow this profound plasticity while keeping it robust to support sun compass navigation and time memory in foragers? What are the social factors in the colony that regulate clock plasticity?  We look for a curious, highly motivated, and skilled postdoc to lead thismultidisciplinary research program.

The projects will integrate sociobiological manipulations, behavioral observations, comparative genomics, and molecular and pharmacological tools to manipulate themolecular clockwork of the bee. 

Required qualifications

  • A PhD degree in molecular evolution, genetics, neurobiology, molecular biology or related fields
  • Relevant lab expertise in neuroanatomy, bioinformatics, or molecular biology techniques
  • An outstanding academic record
  • Experience in organismal biology (e.g., animal behavior, neuroethology, or ecology) is advantageous.
  • Fluent spoken and written English
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, ability to work in a team.

We offer a strong, internationally recognized and interdisciplinary working environment with an open academic atmosphere. Location in the beautiful city of Jerusalem. The position can start on 15 July 2016 or as soon as possible thereafter. The position is for 2-3 years.

For further information please contact: Prof. Guy Bloch (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

Exploring the molecular basis of circadian rhythms in mammals

Here, we offer to investigate both experimentally (Postdoc position) and with mathematical modelling (PhD student position) one potentially crucial switch-like event in the mammalian circadian clockwork, i.e. the heterodimerization of the key clock components PERIOD2 (PER2) and CRYPTOCHROME1 (CRY1). Upon their interaction, this cellular switch initiates a cascade of events that includes building of a huge multi-protein complex (> 1 MDa), accumulation of phosphorylations, nuclear translocation and transcriptional repression. Our recent structural and biochemical data strongly suggest that this switch can be also regulated by redox balance thus representing a potential coupling node of the “classical” transcriptional/translational feedback loop with a recently discovered “ancient” metabolic proto-clock. To better understand the kinetics and dynamics of key events of circadian rhythm generation such as nuclear translocation or transcriptional regulation, we will perturb this PER2-CRY1 dimerization switch with rapidly acting chemical tools in combination with live cell measurement of reporter cells. We will quantify the non-linearities and delays in feedback loops and compare them with theoretical predictions. Thereby we anticipate obtaining a quantitative description in space and time of the mechanisms of circadian rhythm generation in living cells. Moreover, we will explore in our specific system generic design principles of switches including cooperativity, complex formation, sequestration and positive feedback loops. 
 

We look for closely interacting, curious, highly motivated, and skilled postdoc and PhD student to lead this multidisciplinary research program. The projects will integrate biochemical analyses, live cell imaging, chemical biology, and mathematical modelling of the molecular clockwork in mammals. 

Required qualifications: 

Postdoc (Kramer Lab): 

  • A PhD degree in biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology or related fields
  • Relevant lab expertise in biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology techniques
  • An outstanding academic record
  • Experience in microscopy techniques is advantageous.
  • Fluent spoken and written English
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, ability to work in a team. 

PhD student (Herzel lab): 

  • A degree in biochemistry, physics, bioinformatics or related fields 
  • Eperiences in computational biology
  • Fluent spoken and written English
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. 

We offer a strong, internationally recognized and interdisciplinary working environment with an open academic atmosphere. Location in the center of the beautiful and exciting city of Berlin. The positions can start on 1st July 2016 or as soon as possible thereafter. The positions are for 3-4 years. 

For further information please contact: 

Postdoc position:            Professor Achim Kramer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PhD student position:      Professor Hanspeter Herzel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Multiple positions in neuroscience at the University of Warwick Medical School and School of Life Sciences

Multiple positions in neuroscience at the University of Warwick Medical School and School of Life Sciences
 As part of an MRC funded research programme, we are advertising multiple positions in neuroscience at the University of Warwick Medical School and School of Life Sciences.  

We are seeking to appoint an Assistant Professor and three post-doctoral fellows to join a team that will use novel in vivo imaging methods to resolve the dynamic activity of individual neural cells during complex medically-relevant behaviours such as the control of energy balance and body-weight; the chemosensory control of breathing and the orchestration of circadian rhythms by the brain. A key technical goal will be to monitor the activity of the key neural cells via state of the art genetically encoded fluorescent and bioluminescent reporters and cutting edge in vivo single cell microscopy.  

For further information please contact me (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or Nick Dale (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and see here for the job advertisements. Do not hesitate to share this information with anyone that may be interested in the positions. 

Research Fellow (77826-026) with fixed term contract (24 months)

Assistant Professor (77894-036)



Research Fellow in Human Sleep and Molecular Circadian Rhythms (15month contract)

Research Fellow in Human Sleep and Molecular Circadian Rhythms (15month contract)

We are pleased to offer this exciting opportunity to join a BBSRC-funded project that is participating in a study coordinated by the European Space Agency to investigate the effects of extended head-down tilt bed rest (simulating micro-gravity) on human sleep-wake activity, and genome-wide transcriptomics in blood. You will help to coordinate the collection of study data, which will take place at the MEDES Space Clinic in Toulouse. You will employ a wide range of experimental techniques including measurement of activity and light exposure with actigraphy, the acquisition and analysis of sleep and wake EEG using state-of-the-art portable units, analysis of circadian hormones in saliva, the processing and transcriptomic analysis of time series blood RNA samples and associated bioinformatics analyses.

Sleep-wake and actigraphy analyses will be supported by our state-of-the-art facilities and experienced technical staff within the Surrey Sleep Research Centre. Molecular genetic aspects will be performed in our School of Biosciences & Medicine laboratories, which are equipped with facilities for robotic sample processing and genomic analyses. The successful applicant will hold a doctoral degree in a relevant discipline (although individuals near completion may as be considered.)Training can be provided in all of the experimental techniques but previous experience in these areas would be desirable but not essential.  Ideally, we are looking for someone who is highly adaptable and can perform across a range of techniques from integrated disciplines. The project will provide excellent training opportunities.

The position is available for 15 months (from the 1st June 2016) with a salary starting at £30,738, with a possibility to extend for a further 3 months.

The University of Surrey is amongst the highest achieving universities in the United Kingdom, having just been awarded the Times/ Sunday Times University of the Year Award for 2016. Ranked 4th in The Guardian league table for 2016, 8th in the complete University guide and the recipient of three Queen’s Anniversary Prizes. This has positioned Surrey for even greater success in the future.

Please send enquires to:  Dr Simon Archer; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; 01483 686408

We acknowledge, understand and embrace diversity

Closing Date              15th April 2016

Interviews                   anticipated w/c 21st April 2016

Two scientist positions

Experimental Cancer Chronotherapy Unit

Two positions have been opened for scientists to join the new Experimental Cancer Chronotherapy Unit, headed by Prof Francis Levi at Warwick Medical school, Warwick University, Coventry, UK. On line applications must be received before October 10th, 2014. If interested, copy links below in your browser and apply on line. Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
 
 
 
Contact:
Francis Levi, MD, PhD
Professor of Medical Oncology
Cancer Chronotherapy Unit CancerResearch Unit
Office B-166, Warwick Medical School
Warwick University
Gibbett Hill road
Coventry CV4 7AL
United Kingdom
 
Tel (office at WMS): +44 (0)24 7657 5132
Mobile : +44 (0)7 92 18 12 99 32
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

post-doctoral position

Institute of Cellular and Integrative Neurosciences (CNRS‐University of Strasbourg, France)

A 2 year post‐doctoral position starting October 2014, is available at the Institute of Cellular and Integrative Neurosciences (CNRS‐University of Strasbourg, France).